Contact Lens Care

Topic Overview

Safety tips and lens care

The following tips can help you keep your contacts clean and safe, which will help keep your eyes healthy and your vision as clear as possible.

  • Carefully follow the cleaning instructions for your lenses.
  • Keep your lenses and all supplies very clean. Always wash and rinse your hands thoroughly before inserting or removing lenses. Do not apply hand lotion before handling your contacts.
  • Use the lens care system your eye specialist recommends. Do not mix products, because they may not be compatible. Never use homemade saline solutions. (They can be easily contaminated with bacteria.) Do not reuse solution.
  • Never wet your lenses with saliva or place lenses in your mouth. The bacteria that are naturally present in your mouth may cause an eye infection.
  • Always rinse the lens storage case and let it air-dry to avoid contamination. Never use tap water or distilled water to rinse or store your lenses.
  • Get routine eye exams to check the condition of your lenses and the health of your eyes.
  • Contact lenses, especially soft lenses, may absorb eyedrops, which can cause problems. Take your contacts out before you put eye medicine in your eye. You can put your contacts back in 15 minutes after using the eyedrops.
  • Insert your lenses before applying makeup. Take care not to get makeup on the lenses. Replace eye makeup (especially mascara) every 3 to 6 months to reduce the risk of contamination. Do not apply makeup to the inner rim of the eyelid.
  • Decorative color lenses can cause eye problems, such as damage to the cornea or eye infections, just as easily as contact lenses worn for vision correction. To avoid eye problems, be sure to follow the directions for cleaning and wearing these lenses.
  • Do not wear contact lenses when you swim.

To avoid eye problems, be sure to follow the directions for cleaning and wearing contact lenses. Contact lens wearers have an increased risk for serious eye infections and injury to the cornea. Contact lenses can cause eye problems, such as damage to the cornea or eye infections. Small objects that get into the eye may become trapped under a lens and scratch the cornea. Pinkeye (conjunctivitis) or other minor eye infections are likely to irritate your eyes and make wearing contacts uncomfortable and unsafe.

Symptoms of possible problems with contacts include redness, pain or burning in the eye, drainage, blurred vision, or sensitivity to light (photophobia). If you are having problems, remove your lenses and disinfect them. If you have symptoms longer than 2 to 3 hours after removing and cleaning your contacts, call your eye doctor.

Other Places To Get Help

Organizations

American Optometric Association (AOA)
243 North Lindbergh Boulevard
St. Louis, MO  63141
Phone: 1-800-365-2219
Web Address: www.aoa.org
 

The American Optometric Association (AOA), which is a national organization of optometrists, can provide information on eye health and eye problems.


EyeCare America
P.O. Box 429098
San Francisco, CA  94142-9098
Phone: 1-877-887-6327 toll-free
Fax: (415) 561-8567
Web Address: www.eyecareamerica.org
 

EyeCare America is a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. This site aims to raise awareness about eye diseases and eye care. It has information about eye conditions, treatments, and general eye health. You can check to see if you qualify for a free eye exam.


Food and Drug Administration (FDA): Contact Lenses
10903 New Hampshire Avenue
Silver Spring, MD  20993
Phone: 1-800-638-2041
Web Address: www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/HomeHealthandConsumer/ConsumerProducts/ContactLenses/default.htm
Email: dsmica@gda.hhs.gov
 

This website has up-to-date information about contact lenses. It has information about the different types of lenses, contact lens solutions and products, and everyday eye care.


Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Christopher J. Rudnisky, MD, MPH, FRCSC - Ophthalmology
Last Revised October 16, 2012

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