Primary Familial Brain Calcification

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

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It is possible that the main title of the report Primary Familial Brain Calcification is not the name you expected.

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by the presence of abnormal calcium deposits (calcifications) of unknown cause. Associated symptoms include progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities (dementia), loss of contact with reality (psychosis), mood swings and loss of acquired motor skills. As the condition progresses, paralysis may develop that is associated with increased muscle stiffness (rigidity) and restricted movements (spastic paralysis). Additional abnormalities may include relatively slow, involuntary, continual writhing movements (athetosis) or chorea, a related condition characterized by irregular, rapid, jerky movements.

Primary familial brain calcification has recently become the preferred name for this condition because mutations in specific genes are now known to be the cause. Previously, familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification was the preferred name. Fahr's disease is often used for either familial or sporadic basal ganglia calcification, and it is unknown if these are the same or different diseases.

Supporting Organizations

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center

PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311

NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

P.O. Box 5801
Bethesda, MD 20824
Tel: (301)496-5751
Fax: (301)402-2186
Tel: (800)352-9424

For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). For a full-text version of this report, go to and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report.

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

Last Updated:  9/29/2015
Copyright  2015 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.