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Published on December 28, 2015

Women's services center in Middleburg on track for next summer's opening

By Teresa Stepzinski, Florida Times-Union

The $33.1 million maternity and women’s services center being built by St. Vincent’s HealthCare at its Clay County medical center in Middleburg is on schedule for completion late next summer.

Hospital officials during a Dec. 18 topping-out ceremony praised and thanked construction workers for their crucial role making the expansion happen at St. Vincent’s Clay County Medical Center, which is a 64-bed hospital near the intersection of Blanding Boulevard and Branan Field Chaffee Road.

“You’re providing service and the ability for our ministry to continue our outreach to serve those who are struggling today,” Blain Claypool, president of Acute Care for St. Vincent’s HealthCare, told the workers. “You’ve already changed lives in this community and with this project you continue to.”

The J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Women and Infants Pavilion will provide maternity and women’s services. It will include 30 in-patient beds, 13 treatment rooms in the Emergency Department and a shell to add 30 more beds in the future. It means doubling the size of St. Vincent’s Clay County.

“With this new building, you are helping start new families,” said Claypool, also noting the workers’ commitment.

St. Vincent’s will begin hiring in late spring 2016. It plans to fill more than 100 new positions in a variety of fields, both clinical and non-clinical. The hospital broke ground for the expansion project May 22.


Clay County, with nearly 200,000 residents, is home to a highly competitive health care market.

St. Vincent’s Clay County, which opened in October 2013, is one of three major medical facilities in the county. The others are Baptist Clay Medical Campus on Fleming Island and Orange Park Medical Center.

Baptist Health opened its Clay County medical campus in April 2013. It has 24- 7 adult and pediatric emergency room services, a diagnostic center and clinics staffed by Wolfson Children’s Hospital, Nemours Children’s Clinic and the University of Florida College of Medicine. The state Agency for Health Care Administration recently denied Baptist Health’s initial application for a certificate of need to build a 96-bed acute care general hospital at its 32-acre site off U.S. 17 on Fleming Island. Baptist Health has been exploring its options, including the possibility of challenging the denial.

Orange Park Medical Center, with 297 beds, remains the largest hospital in Clay County. In July, it opened a new full-service emergency center on Jacksonville’s Westside. In June, it opened a dedicated Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at its Kingsley Avenue hospital. That followed in the wake of its 2014 opening of a new Pediatric Inpatient Unit, Pediatric Emergency Room waiting room and 10 Pediatric Emergency Room treatment rooms.

Meanwhile, Brooks Rehabilitation Hospital, based in Jacksonville, opened a 10,000-square-foot flagship facility in Orange Park in November. It offers state-of-the-art equipment and enhanced outpatient services.

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